We checked out of our hotel in Salzburg today (7/13/13) and made our way to our new lodgings in Sankt Johann. Because we had bought the Salzburg Card, we made a few stops along the way. The Salzburg Card can be bought for one, two, or three days (Jan. to April and Nov. to Dec. prices are $23, $31, and $36 Euros for adults, $11.50, $15.50, and $18 Euros for kids. From May through October, Adults are $26, $35, and $41 Euros and children are $13, $17.50, and $20.50 Euros).

Villa Trapp

Villa Trapp

It gives you free bus passes, plus free or discounted prices on a number of attractions. True, you may not have planned to visit a number of the places, but we’ve found it to be an amazing way to see the city and get ideas of things to do. With it, so far we have gotten our free CD from the Mozart performance, free entrance into the Mozart Residence and Hellbrunn, a free boat trip down the Salz River, a free funicular trip to the fortress and tour of the museum there, a free cable car ride to the top of Mount Untersberg, and a discount for the Sound of Music tour.
Seminary on Von Trapp property

Seminary on Von Trapp property

We bought the 3 day ticket (72 hours, depending on when you activate it), so we still have another day and a half to use it. As many of these activities are $10 Euros or more a person, it’s a great deal, in my opinion.

Our first stop was the Villa Trapp. Told by Rosa-Maria that we’d be unable to get in, we decided to try it anyway. While it is true that we were unable to get inside the building (no one answered when we buzzed the office), the gate was open, so we were able to get our own pictures of the house. We also visited the seminary next door, but couldn’t get in there either. Alas…

Trick Fountains

Trick Fountains

We continued our journey to Hellbrunn, home most recently of the Sound of Music Gazebo, but for centuries before that, home of the trick fountains. The Prince-Archbishop of Salzburg Markus Sittikus von Hohenems apparently had quite a sense of humor. He constructed Hellbrunn between 1613 and 1616. The trick fountains are a series of fountains around the property which Markus Sitticus could control by building pressure which could be released by a servant at a signal from him. Since this was a summer day property (no bedrooms in Hellbrunn), Sitticus had a stone table built outside. This seemingly innocent construction has eight chairs around it, each with a hole in the center. At a signal from Markus, usually when his guests had had too much wine and were having trouble leaving, he would shoot water through a hole in their seats. His is the only seat with no water pipe under it.

Miniatures which are actually a water pump

Miniatures which are actually a water pump

Additionally, the many garden areas come equipped with holes in the floor or wall through which water shoots. Not only is this a great way to cool off on a summers’ day, but it also provides an amazing grounds with many hidden treasures including statues, ornately detailed rooms, small caves with mini figurines, and an entire musical figurine stage. The architecture and design is truly breath-taking, and one of my favorite spots so far.

View from the mountain top

View from the mountain top

From there, we went to Untersburg to take the cable car up the mountain. If I thought the funicular was scary, this was 10 times worse, since you were traveling up to a height of 6,470 feet, but the beauty at the top is breathtaking. There are a number of things to do at the top (www.untersbergbahn.at/en), but we simply walked around and enjoyed the beauty.

Finally, we settled in our new hotel for the week in Sankt Johann–more gorgeous mountain scenery. More fun tomorrow!

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