In the Liechtenstein Gorge--Walkway visible (R)

In the Liechtenstein Gorge–Walkway visible (R)

We were blessed with another warm and sunny day today (7/17/13) despite weather forecasts to the contrary, so we set out for the Liechtenstein Gorge (Liechtensteinklamm). Our concierge said we could walk there from our hotel–We think they have a different sense of what is a “walkable distance” than Americans do–or else they know a shortcut. We opted to drive, and about 15 minutes later arrived at the parking lots. After parking at one of the first ones we came to (the closer ones being full, we thought), we began the hike up to the entrance. When we finally arrived at the entrance (after a long “American walk”), we discovered there were parking places right next to the entrance. So, always check the closest spot. Also, it seems that Austrians also have a habit of creating their own parking spaces, as we saw numerous cars parked on the side of the road, in pull outs, or other random places.

Waterfall at Liechtenstein Gorge

Waterfall at Liechtenstein Gorge

There is no charge for parking, but a $4.50 Euro fee to enter the gorge, which we paid and set out on our way. The Liechtenstein Gorge is thus named because Johann II (Johann the Good), who was the Prince of Liechtenstein from 1858 to 1929, had the walkways installed in 1875 so that visitors could walk through the Gorge. It is, therefore named for Liechtenstein (and I’d assume Sankt Johann is named for him as well…) It is an amazing walk through caves and over wooden walkways, all interspersed with breathtaking beauty. They estimate this walk will take about an hour and a half, and we made it through at a leisurely pace in two hours, so the estimate was pretty accurate. Whatever you love in nature, you will probably find– blue-green crystal water, rocks in incredible colors and designs, trees, flowers, mountains, sky, waterfalls–you name it. Even though the sun wasn’t shining on the waterfall, it was still beautiful.

Hallstatt

Hallstatt

From there, we decided to take a scenic drive (recommended by Rick Steves) down to Hallstatt. It is considered the oldest continuously inhabited village in Europe and has a large exhibition of prehistoric items. It is a beautiful drive, albeit down windy roads, into the quaint little town. We passed a number of cars parked in pullouts or the side of the road on the way into town. This made sense when we passed the parking for $18 Euros parking lot. We considered ourselves blessed to have found $2.50 Euro an hour with a maximum of $7 Euros at the absolute farthest parking lot from the town until we walked down to the lake and discovered free parking for 30 minutes. We debated on walking up to the old town, but in the end (and watching our time) decided to just take a few pictures and drive around the lake.

The other side of the lake (with free parking)

The other side of the lake (with free parking)

After we found our way back to the car, we headed across the lake, only to find a large area of free parking on the other side of the lake. It is a spot where apparently you can swim, a since many people were. Additionally, there were picnic tables and a lovely place to sit and view the mountains. So depending on the reason you visit Hallstatt, you may want to park there instead of on the town side, though I’m not sure how to walk from there to the old village. All in all, another beautiful day. Tomorrow, we are planning to head to the Celtic Museum, especially if it does, in fact, rain. We may also try to locate an Austrian Second-hand shop, then pack for Italy. More adventures to come!

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