David Replica at Palazzo Vecchio

David Replica at Palazzo Vecchio

Today (7/24/13), we set off for the Accademia to hang out with the David. Unfortunately, you are not allowed to take pictures anywhere in the Accademia, so I have included a picture of David (the replica) in the spot where the original David stood. The original David was designed to go on top of the Duomo. This explains why his head is larger than it should be for his body. Michelangelo was designing it to be viewed by people on the street from its perch atop the Duomo. But, instead it was placed in front of the Palazzo Vecchio. It remained there until 1873 when weather damage posed a threat, and it was moved to the Accademia. Words cannot express how amazing it is to be in the same room with this amazing 14 foot tall piece of sculpture. It truly is awe-inspiring. To see marble veins in the hands, the look of concentration on his face as he contemplates Goliath, and yet his easy confidence–it’s an incredible experience. What struck me most is that Michelangelo always worked freehand. Most sculptures of the time sketched out their works on the marble, indicating where they wanted to chisel. Michelangelo believed he was working for the glory of God and would wait until he felt the inspiration for a piece, then work feverishly for days. As he stated, “Many believe – and I believe – that I have been designated for this work by God. In spite of my old age, I do not want to give it up; I work out of love for God and I put all my hope in Him.” When carving, he started with the torso and worked proportionally from there, moving from front to back, which caused another artist to describe watching him work like “seeing a figure emerge from the surface of the water.”

Memorial to Lorenzo Bartolini at Santa Croce

Memorial to Lorenzo Bartolini at Santa Croce

Though the David is colossal and impressive, it is not the only impressive work in the Accademia. The Rape (Abduction) of the Sabine Women by Giambologna was in restoration, so we weren’t able to see this one. But, as you walk towards the area which houses the David, you walk alongside a number of other Michelangelo sculptures, affectionately named “The Prisoners.” These are unfinished works of Michelangelo, called prisoners because they have not yet been freed from the marble blocks. They are incredible in their own right, as they show the transition from marble to finished stature. At the end of the line of prisoners is another Pieta, attributed to Michelangelo, but not necessarily his.

Another area of the Accademia is devoted to the plaster work done as a model for sculpture. A number of artists made plaster versions of their work, measured the dimensions, then transferred it to marble. One big surprise I had is that a number of the plaster sculptures were attributed to the artist Lorenzo Bartolini, a name fans of Letters to Juliet will immediately recognize. This Lorenzo Bartolini became a famous portrait sculptor after painting Napoleon Bonaparte and his family. The busts of a number of important people are modeled here.

Cappelle Medicee

Cappelle Medicee

From the Accademia, we headed to Cappelle Medicee. This incredible chapel was designed by Michelangelo, and he has a number of statues there as well, most adorning the sarcophagi of the Duke of Nemours and his nephew. Each tomb has the interred (the Duke or his nephew) arrayed like a Roman captain, while underneath lounge a male and female figure representing day and night. The chapel also housed some amazing reliquaries.

Sepulchre of Michelangelo

Sepulchre of Michelangelo

After the Cappelle Medicee, we tried to go to the Pallazzo Medici Riccardi, but it was closed. (Each of the museums has different days it is closed, as well as hours it closes early.) So, we headed to Santa Croce. (This is another “cover up zone.”) This cathedral is rather plain on the interior, but contains memorials and the sepulchres of some amazing men: Galileo, Michelangelo, Dante, Machiavelli, and Lorenzo Bartolini to name a few. It is incredible to walk around the chapel and see these amazing designs. From the chapel, you can look into a number of side areas containing original frescos. Another room holds reliquaries, including part of the frock of St. Francis of Assisi. From the museum, you go into a central courtyard area where you can see another museum or choose to go to the hall of sepulchres. It is fascinating to see the way people were interred at this time.

Finally, we headed home to rest a bit before picking up the car at Piazzale Michelangelo. When we had left the car, I was in the first spot so I could just pull out to leave. When we returned, four other cars had created their own parking spaces around me. Sigh…So much for easy parking.

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