Pocket sundials

Pocket sundials

We set out this morning (7/30/13) to explore the Black Forest region. Our goal was not necessarily just the end destination, but also to enjoy the beauty along the way. Our first stop was the Deutsches Uhrenmuseum (Clock Museum). This was another Rick Steves recommendation, but mom thought she remembered it as well. Turns out, it was a different location. But, we paid the 2 Euros parking and went in, after paying 5 Euros for mom and 4 Euros for me–she gave me the student rate, since I am still a student.
Outdoor Museum

Outdoor Museum

This museum gives a thorough view of clock making and the way that clocks have changed through the generations. Some of my favorite exhibits were the musical clocks and the pocket sundials. It also had an alarm clock candle, which I thought was hilarious as well. The museum was interesting, but not as “must see” as Rick Steves made it out to be.

From there, we headed to the Vogtsbauernhof–the Black Forest Open Air Museum. This is a historic village which offers houses from many different time periods from the 1600’s up until present day. It reminds me a lot of Conner Prairie near Indianapolis. Outside of each house is a triangular display that can be switched between German, English, and French, in order that most tourists can understand the different areas. Like most historic villages, it offers something for everyone: Animals to pet, herb gardens, minerals, woodworking, and a giant play place for children. It was a lovely and relaxing place to learn and well worth the 8 Euro admission fee (plus 1.50 parking).

Clock of the year

Clock of the year

After Vogtsbauernhof, we headed home by way of the House of 1000 clocks, where I purchased my own black forest clock (though small and battery run was about the top of my budget.) Here, you can find clocks from the small 20 Euro range up to the 1000 Euro range. The “Clock of the Year” cost 809.90 Euros. Definitely beautiful to see, though, even if you can’t take one home. We also stopped by another little wood working store which offered many hand carved wooden items as well.

Finally, we headed to the Triberg Falls. This beautiful waterfall is one of Germany’s largest, with a 163 meter descent (it’s not a straight drop, so they count how many meters it goes down.) Because we arrived after 6:00, entry was free (saving us 3.50 Euros each.) We chose to go to the middle of the Falls, though visitors may approach from the top, middle, or bottom. We didn’t want to have to walk too far up or down.

Triberg Falls

Triberg Falls

This is truly an amazing waterfall, though the yellowish water marred the appearance somewhat, I think. Finally, it was time to head home to enjoy our Black Forest cake, which looked amazing, but is nothing to write home about (in my opinion.) Definitely a good day with many beautiful sights.

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