Boat to Herrenchiemsee

Boat to Herrenchiemsee

We decided to finish up with Ludwig II on Wednesday (8/7/13) by visiting his last castle at Herrenchiemsee. If you type Herrenchiemsee in Google for directions, it will tell you it is impossible to get there. This is because Herrenchiemsee is located on an Island. What you have to do is go to Prien am Chiemsee and catch a boat from there. Thankfully, the GPS will take you right to the pier.

Carriage

Carriage

We arrived, got parking (ours ended up being 3.50 Euros for the time we were there), and headed out to get the boat. The boat ticket was a little over 4 Euros per person and covers the trip to Herrenchiemsee Island, plus two other island stops. The boats tend to run approximately every half hour between 8:30 ish and 7, though the times are not exactly regular–the time tables are posted, though. We managed to time things well, and got there just in time to catch a boat over. We got our tickets for free (Still covered by the castle card we bought at Neuschwanstein) and had about a half an hour to make the 25 minute walk up to the castle. While this wasn’t the steep walk of some of the other castles, we were concerned we might not make it in time for our tour, so we opted to take the horse drawn carriage for 3 Euros each. This was actually an excellent choice, as the carriage drops you off right at the entrance to the castle.

Herrenchiemsee

Herrenchiemsee

Herrenchiemsee was designed by Ludwig to be an exact copy of Versailles. His love of all things French (specifically being an absolute monarch) is more than evident here. Once again, we were in a no camera zone, except for the unfinished parts and the basement. This castle is the last of King Ludwig II’s, and he actually only spent 10 days here, though he stopped by annually to check on the building progress. It stopped being built when the King ran out of money, and consequently was never finished. The rooms that are finished, however, are as breathtaking as one would expect from King Ludwig. One thing that interested me in this castle is that he has two bedrooms.
Bottom of the Table contraption

Bottom of the Table contraption

One is the State Bedroom–an exact copy of King Louis XIV, except King Ludwig’s is a touch bigger (that ever present quest to out-do the other guy.) King Ludwig never actually slept in this bed (no one has, to my knowledge.) Yet the curtains hanging around the bed are stitched with painted thread and took 30 women 9 years to complete. They cost more than the entire island of Herrenchiemsee! Curtains!! That kind of artistry (or extravagance) astounds me. The other bedroom is the one Ludwig actually slept in (for the 10 days he was actually at this palace.) You can tell it’s his bedroom because it’s decorated in his favorite blue instead of the red of the Versailles bedroom. Additionally, it’s interesting that there is nothing Bavarian anywhere in the castle–all of the decorations are either French or mythological. Very interesting.
Funeral mask and picture

Funeral mask and picture

One other feature of the rooms here that is the same as at Linderhof is the “magical” table, supposedly in reference to the German tale, “Little table, set thyself.” This table is made to lower into the floor and return set for meals. It is located just off the porcelain room which contains an amazing collection of porcelain pieces and a porcelain chandelier.

We concluded the tour of the finished rooms and went into the museum. Here you can see Ludwig’s funeral mask and portrait of his death. (I took this before I realized the no picture rule applied here as well. Since I have it, I might as well share 🙂 ) Additionally, you can see the cloaks Ludwig wore on special occasions of state. One of the things that was the most interesting to me was the engagement photo of Ludwig and Sophie, which you can view here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/12634458@N04/5812436315/ I love the way photographs speak about a person, and this one says volumes!

Unfinished area

Unfinished area

First, I noticed that Sophie is looking, while demurely, straight at the camera with a touch of a smile. Ludwig, on the other hand, is staring up and to his left, away from her and the camera. Additionally, their hands are interesting. I have been escorted by many men in many different situations with various degrees of attachment, but almost every man does the same thing when you take his arm: he instinctively tucks his elbow to his side, sometimes resting his hand over yours. Ludwig’s arm is stiff and away from his body with his hand clenched and facing up–almost recoiling. Obviously, this is not a comfortable pose for him. Seeing this picture, I think, is a foreshadowing that this marriage is not going to work. Perhaps knowing he breaks off the engagement makes me read into things, but I think there’s more to it than that.

1/3 of Ludwig's "bathtub"

1/3 of Ludwig’s “bathtub”

From the museum, we continued down into the unfinished part of the castle. Having seen so many finished castles, it’s amazing to see one in progress. Herrenchiemsee has chosen to fill the unfinished rooms with modern art (which I don’t have much of an appreciation for, but I suppose others do, and it’s better than 28 rooms of blank bricks.) One can only imagine what these rooms would have looked like had Ludwig had more time and money. There are three rooms (2 1/2) that are finished in the lower level. The first is the servants area where the table was raised and lowered. From there, you walk into an area that is Ludwig’s bathtub. I’d call it a swimming pool as it’s larger than most swimming pools in American back yards. Finally, you end up in Ludwig’s ornate dressing room, concluding the tour of the castle.

Fountains

Fountains

We made it out to the gardens just in time for the fountains to go off. These fountains are incredibly beautiful, so it was neat to see them with all the water gushing. We had opted to walk back down instead of taking the carriage again, so we headed down the peaceful path through the woods to the monastery.

This is the monastery where Ludwig would stay when he came to make his annual check on the progress of his castle. His room here is blue, but that’s about as much of home as he is able to retain.

Ludwig's room

Ludwig’s room

The monks apparently didn’t cater to his desires for grandeur. I wonder how they took to his sleeping schedule as well, or if he altered it for his stay here. Other than a small chapel and Ludwig’s rooms, there wasn’t much else to see at the monastery so we went down to wait for the other boat. and got to see a rainbow!

The boat took us over to Fraueninsel, another island in Chiemsee. This small village of 300 gives a beautiful view of the old palace (monastery), and has its own Benedictine convent. The convent acted as a “reform school for fallen women” until 1995, and is now a convent again.

The Imperial Abbey of Frauenchiemsee

The Imperial Abbey of Frauenchiemsee

It was amazing to stand inside and view the beauty, all the while listening to the nuns singing somewhere above you. Shades of Sound of Music. Finally, we decided it was time to head home. After figuring out which boat would take us back to our car, we headed out. It has been an adventure getting to know King Ludwig II.

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