Nature


Fort Necessity

I was excited to head to Fort Necessity today (8/1/17) because this is where it all began:  The French Indian War which gave rise to the American Revolution.  So much of Washington is tied up in this area–his worst defeat, his biggest betrayal, his deepest humiliation, and the loss of a surrogate father figure.  Standing on the ground here, I felt, would give me the greatest insight for my book.  It is a truly incredible place.

I hadn’t realized that Washington and his men had spent almost two months clearing land for a road to attack Fort Duquesne.  One thing that has always stood out to me in this area is just how many trees there are–everywhere.  I can’t imagine trying to carve a path through them, much less fighting in them.  When he happened upon the Great Meadows, it must have seemed an oasis in the desert.  He termed it, “A charming field for an engagement.”  For a man who desperately wanted a British commission and who had been trained in the shoulder to shoulder British style of fighting, this spot was perfect.  Still, he hadn’t intended it for military service, but merely a supply station for troops attacking Fort Duquesne.

Another view of the fort

That all changed when three days later, Washington’s ally Tanacharison (the Half King) informed Washington there were French in the area (about 7 miles away).  His actions later make me wonder if this was a set-up, and he was simply using Washington.   Washington and 40 men set out to the Half King’s camp.  When they arrive, his scouts lead them to a ravine where the French are encamped.  From this point, two different versions of the story come into place.  Like typical siblings, both the French and the British claim the other one started it.  The French claim the British surprised them, and they fired back.  The British claim the French saw them approaching and fired first, with the British return fire being self defense.  Whatever actually happened, at the end of the day, the French commander Joseph Coulon de Villiers (Sieur de Jumonville) and 9 others were killed, one wounded, 21 prisoners, and one man who escaped to carry the news to Fort Duquesne.  British casualties were one killed, two wounded.  This would lead me to believe the British fired first, though they did have the high ground, so the disparity in casualties could come from that.  The interesting thing is that Coulon de Villiers was actually only wounded and was possibly trying to surrender–until the Half King got ahold of him–literally.  With a tomahawk.

Diorama of the Fort

When British Colonel Fry falls off his horse and dies of his injuries two days later, Washington is promoted to Colonel.  With the weight of leadership on his shoulders and the expectation of French retaliation from Fort Duqesne, Washington begins to try to make the area a fort, while still trying to do work on the road.  He has men guard those working on the road, but even with reinforcements still only has about 400 men.  His Indian allies meet with him, but when they realize Washington’s supplies haven’t come through as promised, and he has barely enough provisions for his men, they decide the British are a lost cause and refuse to fight.  Thus, Washington will face the 700 approaching Frenchmen and Indians with no allies.  I’m sure this was a huge betrayal by those he thought would stand with him–especially the man who was actually to blame for the incident.  But, it’s about to get a whole lot worse.

Artillery demonstration

It’s a horrible, rainy day on July 3, making fighting sporadic, as both sides are dealing with wet gunpowder, and Washington’s men are standing in trenches, which are slowly filling up.  The commander of the French Army is none other than the Louis, brother of Joseph Coulon de Villiers.  But, Providence will both save Washington and humiliate him.  The Indians with the French prefer the element of surprise and the spoils of war.  Seeing that there is neither at this time, they tell Louis Coulon De Villiers that they will leave in the morning.  He has a choice to make.

He requests a truce to parlay, offering Washington the chance to surrender.  But, when the terms are sent to Washington, they are smudged because of the rain.  Washington’s normal translator had been killed, and the man who was translating was Dutch, but could understand most of what was said.  Most being the key word.  He informs Washington that the terms are generous, allowing Washington and his men to leave with honors of war, taking their baggage and weapons (but no swivel guns–like little cannons) and return immediately to Virginia.  They had to leave two men as hostages (who would volunteer, then provide valuable intelligence as spies.)  Unfortunately, the translator left out the part where, by signing, Washington is admitting to the assassination of Joseph Coulon de Villiers, whom the French claim was acting as an ambassador, in the same role as Washington himself–though papers in his effects give the possibility he was spying as well (as the British would claim).  This report makes it all over Europe and the colonies, and Washington is humiliated.  Though Governor Dinwiddie doesn’t blame Washington when he reaches Virginia, he will disband the Virginia regiments into garrison companies, and will offer Washington the demoted rank of Captain.  When Washington is unable to negotiate a higher rank, he will leave military service less than three months after the Fort Necessity debacle and return to Mount Vernon.

Braddock’s memorial

But, Washington doesn’t get too comfortable in the quiet life as a farmer.  When General Braddock is named Commander in chief of the British forces and arrives in America with two Irish regiments, Washington sends him a note of congratulations–a great way to get noticed.  Because of the way British commissions worked, Washington would be subordinate to even his British inferiors, so he makes the decision to accept the offer to join as Braddock’s Aide de Camp–a volunteer position in which he only answered to Braddock, and he could pave the way to a commissioned rank.

I can’t imagine what he must have felt when his path led him back to Fort Necessity, where the bones of his men were still visible against the landscape (the French had burned Fort Necessity to the ground.)  But, he had another chance to assault Fort Duquesne.  Unfortunately, it would be another devastating loss.

View of Braddock’s original burial site (right) and monument (left)

Braddock has mostly heeded Washington’s advice on the advance.  He has men scouting and protecting the flanks and rear as the army crosses the Monongahela River.  When he doesn’t get ambushed, however, Braddock assumes the French are holed up in the fort and pulls the scouts in, lining his men up, unfurling the banners, and striking up the band.  There’s not a chance the French can miss their arrival.  Unfortunately.  Unbeknownst to him, the French know Braddock’s coming and had made the decision to surprise attack–they just didn’t make it to the river in time.  The two armies slam into each other.  And though the British have over twice the numbers, the French and Indians are fighting ambush style, hitting the flanks from the treeline, and the British lines literally collapse into each other, forming a mass of red coated men–a horribly easy target.  Washington and Braddock, both on horseback, are trying to return order to the situation.  Both have horses shot from under them.  Both have bullet holes in their clothing.  Both are unhit–until Braddock is struck with a bullet to the shoulder which passes into his chest.  Washington is able to get him into a wagon and off the field, then assemble the men and cover the retreat.

The original spot where Braddock was buried.

Unfortunately, Braddock, who had been a sort of father figure to 24 year old George who had lost his own father at 11, would die three days later.  Washington himself will preside over the burial, choosing to bury him in the road he had built where soldiers will march over his grave, obscuring the site from those who would seek to desecrate the body.  He will remain there until 1804 when men repairing this section of the road will stumble upon the remains and move them to the hill.

Ironically, this site of so much pain will be bought by Washington who visited after the war.  For the surveyor, it is indeed a beautiful piece of land, but I can’t imagine being able to see past all the memories he would have had.  But, knowing that he also revisited Valley Forge, I believe Washington didn’t shy away from the hard places.  Perhaps that’s another thing that makes him great.

 

 

 

 

 

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Abbey at Tegernsee

Abbey at Tegernsee

We had decided to take it easy and pack in a leisurely fashion on our last two days. The weather was predicting clouds and rain, so we had made sure to do all of our “must sees” before that time. Anything left would be a bonus. Thursday (8/8/13) was a cloudy day, but we opted to take an afternoon drive into Tegernsee just to check it out.

Lake Tegernsee

Lake Tegernsee

We had driven past Tegernsee many times on trips to and from other places, but had never stopped. This beautiful village is on the shores of Lake Tegernsee and has an Abbey dating back to 746 (not a typo–there’s no 1 in front of that…) The Abbey and the town derive their name from old high German “tegarin seo”, meaning “large lake.” It was also one of the last stands of the SS during World War II. The SS had retreated here to defend against the American forces advancing from Bad Tölz. The Abbey was later adopted as the summer residence of the Bavarian rulers. The Abbey was closed when we were there, so we didn’t get to explore inside (if the public is even allowed in.)

Instead, we browsed around the stores selling Dirndls and Lederhosen, and just enjoyed the peace and quiet. I think this is the biggest adjustment I will have to get used to back in the states. Here, regardless of how big a crowd there is, the noise isn’t very loud. Down by the Abbey, mom commented on the crowd of people at the restaurant who were somewhat loud. Still there were about 200 of them, outside, and I’d say it was quieter than a room of 30-40 in the States.

Additionally, Tegernsee, like most of this area, has beautiful gardens and the Lake. We found a local Gelato place (Eiscafe Cristallo) for one last Gelato.

Gelataria

Gelataria

This place actually had Red Bull Gelato–no, sorry, we didn’t try it. I don’t like regular Red Bull, so I wouldn’t waste a gelato on Red Bull. I had two flavors I couldn’t identify, but looked good. One ended up being a peanut butter and chocolatey flavor, while the other which I thought was Dark chocolate, was actually dark chocolate with black licorice. I hate black licorice, but it wasn’t too bad, once you got over the “Whoa, that’s not chocolate!” response.

Traditionally dressed family

Traditionally dressed family


Finally, the inevitable–it was time to go home. Now, as I sit here, we have finished the bulk of our packing, and are finishing up our stores of food and the last minutes to prepare us to leave tomorrow. When I get home, I will have one week until school starts, and another whole slew of adventures begin. This summer has definitely been a journey–From school ending, to Russia, to Gettysburg’s 150th, to Europe, and full circle to school again.
Rainy Day in Schliersee

Rainy Day in Schliersee

I deeply appreciate those of you who have come along for the ride. The thing I think I will go home with is the blessing of getting to know the people who lived here, struggled, were creative, overcame obstacles, and brought something beautiful to the world. I may not have met them personally, but their stories have impacted mine. And that, I think, is the true meaning of leaving a legacy. So, as this journey ends, I will continue to hunt down the legacies of the men and women who have shaped the world by the light they left behind, all the while trying to shape my legacy to inspire others the way they have. Til then…

Boat to Herrenchiemsee

Boat to Herrenchiemsee

We decided to finish up with Ludwig II on Wednesday (8/7/13) by visiting his last castle at Herrenchiemsee. If you type Herrenchiemsee in Google for directions, it will tell you it is impossible to get there. This is because Herrenchiemsee is located on an Island. What you have to do is go to Prien am Chiemsee and catch a boat from there. Thankfully, the GPS will take you right to the pier.

Carriage

Carriage

We arrived, got parking (ours ended up being 3.50 Euros for the time we were there), and headed out to get the boat. The boat ticket was a little over 4 Euros per person and covers the trip to Herrenchiemsee Island, plus two other island stops. The boats tend to run approximately every half hour between 8:30 ish and 7, though the times are not exactly regular–the time tables are posted, though. We managed to time things well, and got there just in time to catch a boat over. We got our tickets for free (Still covered by the castle card we bought at Neuschwanstein) and had about a half an hour to make the 25 minute walk up to the castle. While this wasn’t the steep walk of some of the other castles, we were concerned we might not make it in time for our tour, so we opted to take the horse drawn carriage for 3 Euros each. This was actually an excellent choice, as the carriage drops you off right at the entrance to the castle.

Herrenchiemsee

Herrenchiemsee

Herrenchiemsee was designed by Ludwig to be an exact copy of Versailles. His love of all things French (specifically being an absolute monarch) is more than evident here. Once again, we were in a no camera zone, except for the unfinished parts and the basement. This castle is the last of King Ludwig II’s, and he actually only spent 10 days here, though he stopped by annually to check on the building progress. It stopped being built when the King ran out of money, and consequently was never finished. The rooms that are finished, however, are as breathtaking as one would expect from King Ludwig. One thing that interested me in this castle is that he has two bedrooms.
Bottom of the Table contraption

Bottom of the Table contraption

One is the State Bedroom–an exact copy of King Louis XIV, except King Ludwig’s is a touch bigger (that ever present quest to out-do the other guy.) King Ludwig never actually slept in this bed (no one has, to my knowledge.) Yet the curtains hanging around the bed are stitched with painted thread and took 30 women 9 years to complete. They cost more than the entire island of Herrenchiemsee! Curtains!! That kind of artistry (or extravagance) astounds me. The other bedroom is the one Ludwig actually slept in (for the 10 days he was actually at this palace.) You can tell it’s his bedroom because it’s decorated in his favorite blue instead of the red of the Versailles bedroom. Additionally, it’s interesting that there is nothing Bavarian anywhere in the castle–all of the decorations are either French or mythological. Very interesting.
Funeral mask and picture

Funeral mask and picture

One other feature of the rooms here that is the same as at Linderhof is the “magical” table, supposedly in reference to the German tale, “Little table, set thyself.” This table is made to lower into the floor and return set for meals. It is located just off the porcelain room which contains an amazing collection of porcelain pieces and a porcelain chandelier.

We concluded the tour of the finished rooms and went into the museum. Here you can see Ludwig’s funeral mask and portrait of his death. (I took this before I realized the no picture rule applied here as well. Since I have it, I might as well share 🙂 ) Additionally, you can see the cloaks Ludwig wore on special occasions of state. One of the things that was the most interesting to me was the engagement photo of Ludwig and Sophie, which you can view here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/12634458@N04/5812436315/ I love the way photographs speak about a person, and this one says volumes!

Unfinished area

Unfinished area

First, I noticed that Sophie is looking, while demurely, straight at the camera with a touch of a smile. Ludwig, on the other hand, is staring up and to his left, away from her and the camera. Additionally, their hands are interesting. I have been escorted by many men in many different situations with various degrees of attachment, but almost every man does the same thing when you take his arm: he instinctively tucks his elbow to his side, sometimes resting his hand over yours. Ludwig’s arm is stiff and away from his body with his hand clenched and facing up–almost recoiling. Obviously, this is not a comfortable pose for him. Seeing this picture, I think, is a foreshadowing that this marriage is not going to work. Perhaps knowing he breaks off the engagement makes me read into things, but I think there’s more to it than that.

1/3 of Ludwig's "bathtub"

1/3 of Ludwig’s “bathtub”

From the museum, we continued down into the unfinished part of the castle. Having seen so many finished castles, it’s amazing to see one in progress. Herrenchiemsee has chosen to fill the unfinished rooms with modern art (which I don’t have much of an appreciation for, but I suppose others do, and it’s better than 28 rooms of blank bricks.) One can only imagine what these rooms would have looked like had Ludwig had more time and money. There are three rooms (2 1/2) that are finished in the lower level. The first is the servants area where the table was raised and lowered. From there, you walk into an area that is Ludwig’s bathtub. I’d call it a swimming pool as it’s larger than most swimming pools in American back yards. Finally, you end up in Ludwig’s ornate dressing room, concluding the tour of the castle.

Fountains

Fountains

We made it out to the gardens just in time for the fountains to go off. These fountains are incredibly beautiful, so it was neat to see them with all the water gushing. We had opted to walk back down instead of taking the carriage again, so we headed down the peaceful path through the woods to the monastery.

This is the monastery where Ludwig would stay when he came to make his annual check on the progress of his castle. His room here is blue, but that’s about as much of home as he is able to retain.

Ludwig's room

Ludwig’s room

The monks apparently didn’t cater to his desires for grandeur. I wonder how they took to his sleeping schedule as well, or if he altered it for his stay here. Other than a small chapel and Ludwig’s rooms, there wasn’t much else to see at the monastery so we went down to wait for the other boat. and got to see a rainbow!

The boat took us over to Fraueninsel, another island in Chiemsee. This small village of 300 gives a beautiful view of the old palace (monastery), and has its own Benedictine convent. The convent acted as a “reform school for fallen women” until 1995, and is now a convent again.

The Imperial Abbey of Frauenchiemsee

The Imperial Abbey of Frauenchiemsee

It was amazing to stand inside and view the beauty, all the while listening to the nuns singing somewhere above you. Shades of Sound of Music. Finally, we decided it was time to head home. After figuring out which boat would take us back to our car, we headed out. It has been an adventure getting to know King Ludwig II.

Lake Lazern

Lake Lazern

We set out this morning (7/31/13) to explore Switzerland. We had checked out the internet for recommendations, but really just wanted to take a scenic drive through the countryside (not spending three hours stuck in a traffic jam.) To this end, we headed down to Luzern as a starting point. We had no idea what it had to offer, other than pretty lakes.

After about a two hour drive (mostly highway, but still in view of the scenery), we arrived. We found parking in the Frei Parking, only to discover that Frei does not mean free as in “costing no money” but free as in “available.” Depending on how long you stayed, you could rack up a 28 Franc bill. We opted for between an hour (3 Francs) and two (5 Franks.)

Parking secured, we walked across the street, stopped in the hotel to get a map, and headed out to the lake. This is truly a beautiful area. Lake Luzern (Lucerne is an alternate spelling) is quite serene with swans swimming along it and sailboats on its placid waters. We walked along the lake and found the Bachmann bakery stand. We bought a chocolate roll and a hazelnut roll. WOW! After almost three weeks of wheat sandwich bread, this fluffy, melt in your mouth variety was incredible. (We bought 4 more to take with us on our way back.)

Past the bakery, we headed into the old city to see the beautiful architecture. We contemplated seeing a lunch show, but opted to keep going. One of the neat sites in Luzern is the Chapel Bridge (German: Kapellbrücke). This bridge is the oldest wooden covered bridge in Europe and the oldest truss bridge in the world, dating back to 1333.

Chapel Bridge (Luzern)

Chapel Bridge (Luzern)

Unfortunately, part of this great treasure was destroyed in 1993 when the bridge caught fire. It lost all but 30 of the original 158 (147 before the fire) internal paintings which were done in the 17th century. Thankfully, it has been beautifully restored and is an amazing sight to behold. We concluded our journey through the old town by stopping at Bachmann’s chocolatiers.

Then, we had wanted to take a scenic route through mountain towns, but headed out the wrong way (GPS miscommunications…), so took another highway drive to the breathtaking Lake Urnersee. We stopped at a pull out by the exit for Morschach to enjoy our lunch and the beautiful landscape. One of the things mom and I both love is just enjoying the beauty of nature, and this spot had beauty in all forms.

Lake Urnersee

Lake Urnersee

Finally, it was time to turn back for home. Once again, we planned to drive along the lakes, and once again, the roads took us away via highways and guard rails, so mom didn’t get the drive she wanted. (Though, she did comment that perhaps the sleepy little villages had changed in the 45 years since she was here before.) It still was a beautiful drive, and I’m glad to explore a bit of Switzerland. It definitely makes me like it better than sitting for almost three hours to get through the tunnel did. Wherever you are, there is amazing beauty and peaceful tranquility. It reminds me of something Rick Steves said in his description of the Black Forest. He mentioned that doctors in Germany would prescribe vacation trips to the spas to maintain your health. I think we all might enjoy life a bit better if we take time to enjoy the beauty along the way.
Our haul of chocolate

Our haul of chocolate

Florence early evening

Florence early evening

Mom still wasn’t feeling well, so we took a true day of rest for our first whole day in Florence (7/21/13). We slept in, went grocery shopping sans car, and caught up on business. After resting, though, she felt better, so we decided to venture out into the city. Our plan was to head to Piazzele Michelangelo which offers free parking we plan to take advantage of some of the time this week.

Piazzele Michelangelo at Sunset

Piazzele Michelangelo at Sunset

The Piazzele is a beautiful vantage point from which to see the city. We explored the street vendors a bit, bought 5 Euro T-shirts, and took a few pictures before heading to a cafe under the overlook to have dinner. Definitely a good choice! We ordered a pizza and a Panini and shared both, which were incredible, and we got a view overlooking Florence to boot. We were not alone in our decision to come out and watch the sunset; the piazzele was packed with people doing exactly the same thing we were.

Gelateria

Gelateria

After a beautiful sunset and some fancy maneuvering to squeeze out of the parking lot (European parking spaces are way narrower than American ones), we drove back home and headed on foot down to our corner Gelateria. It looked amazing and tasted even better. Can’t wait to see more of the city this week.

In the Liechtenstein Gorge--Walkway visible (R)

In the Liechtenstein Gorge–Walkway visible (R)

We were blessed with another warm and sunny day today (7/17/13) despite weather forecasts to the contrary, so we set out for the Liechtenstein Gorge (Liechtensteinklamm). Our concierge said we could walk there from our hotel–We think they have a different sense of what is a “walkable distance” than Americans do–or else they know a shortcut. We opted to drive, and about 15 minutes later arrived at the parking lots. After parking at one of the first ones we came to (the closer ones being full, we thought), we began the hike up to the entrance. When we finally arrived at the entrance (after a long “American walk”), we discovered there were parking places right next to the entrance. So, always check the closest spot. Also, it seems that Austrians also have a habit of creating their own parking spaces, as we saw numerous cars parked on the side of the road, in pull outs, or other random places.

Waterfall at Liechtenstein Gorge

Waterfall at Liechtenstein Gorge

There is no charge for parking, but a $4.50 Euro fee to enter the gorge, which we paid and set out on our way. The Liechtenstein Gorge is thus named because Johann II (Johann the Good), who was the Prince of Liechtenstein from 1858 to 1929, had the walkways installed in 1875 so that visitors could walk through the Gorge. It is, therefore named for Liechtenstein (and I’d assume Sankt Johann is named for him as well…) It is an amazing walk through caves and over wooden walkways, all interspersed with breathtaking beauty. They estimate this walk will take about an hour and a half, and we made it through at a leisurely pace in two hours, so the estimate was pretty accurate. Whatever you love in nature, you will probably find– blue-green crystal water, rocks in incredible colors and designs, trees, flowers, mountains, sky, waterfalls–you name it. Even though the sun wasn’t shining on the waterfall, it was still beautiful.

Hallstatt

Hallstatt

From there, we decided to take a scenic drive (recommended by Rick Steves) down to Hallstatt. It is considered the oldest continuously inhabited village in Europe and has a large exhibition of prehistoric items. It is a beautiful drive, albeit down windy roads, into the quaint little town. We passed a number of cars parked in pullouts or the side of the road on the way into town. This made sense when we passed the parking for $18 Euros parking lot. We considered ourselves blessed to have found $2.50 Euro an hour with a maximum of $7 Euros at the absolute farthest parking lot from the town until we walked down to the lake and discovered free parking for 30 minutes. We debated on walking up to the old town, but in the end (and watching our time) decided to just take a few pictures and drive around the lake.

The other side of the lake (with free parking)

The other side of the lake (with free parking)

After we found our way back to the car, we headed across the lake, only to find a large area of free parking on the other side of the lake. It is a spot where apparently you can swim, a since many people were. Additionally, there were picnic tables and a lovely place to sit and view the mountains. So depending on the reason you visit Hallstatt, you may want to park there instead of on the town side, though I’m not sure how to walk from there to the old village. All in all, another beautiful day. Tomorrow, we are planning to head to the Celtic Museum, especially if it does, in fact, rain. We may also try to locate an Austrian Second-hand shop, then pack for Italy. More adventures to come!

The image of Hitler as we usually see him

The image of Hitler as we usually see him

Today (7/16/13), we headed up to Obersalzburg in Berchtesgaden, Germany, to the Documentation Museum. I think mom expected it to be a shorter trip than it ended up being, but I have been fascinated with the plight of Jews in World War II almost as long as I can remember. (I did my eighth grade research paper on Jewish persecution.) So, the opportunity to “get inside Hitler’s head,” if you will, was one I couldn’t take for granted. Additionally, understanding ethnocentrism as I do, I wanted to see how the Germans would portray their own history. Would they gloss over the ugly parts? Would Hitler be venerated or despised? It was a chance of a lifetime for me, and I took full advantage of it (about 5 1/2 hours worth.)

The unseen faces of Hitler

The unseen faces of Hitler

Rick Steves recommends giving yourself an hour and a half for the tour. I’d say it depends on how interested you are in the subject. We chose to pay the $2 Euro cost for an audio tour (in addition to the $3 Euro entrance fee–parking was free in the section we were in–P2) The audio tour itself recommends two hours. The tour intentionally starts you on a higher, lighter level and then moves you down through time into the dark, dankness of the bunker. A large section is devoted to Hitler’s decision to make Obersalzburg his “second home” and how that impacted the people who were living there. What I appreciated most is that it shows Hitler as an entire person. You see him smiling at children, lounging in his home, throwing dinner parties, studying for speeches, and a million other mundane activities.

Propaganda aimed at young people

Propaganda aimed at young people

But, in the next area, you see the propaganda techniques used to portray these images. It shows the hard truth of how many people lost their generational homes in the area to accommodate Hitler’s compound. It traces his journey from his portrayal of himself as the people’s chancellor to his portrayal of strength and brutality.

Three of the founding members of the White Rose--all were beheaded

Three of the founding members of the White Rose–all were beheaded

Because I work with youth for a living, I was especially fascinated with the role of young people. True, there are a number of images of young people looking adoringly at Hitler, but the displays were also brutally honest about the lengths Hitler went to to court such adoration. For one season of time, it was only the youth who were allowed to visit his Obersalzburg home. Yet, there are also those who stood against Hitler and his ideas. Most notably among the young people were the members of the White Rose, an organization made up of students from the University of Munich and their philosophy professor. Hans Scholl (left in the picture) read a sermon by an outspoken preacher on the evils of Hitler’s use of euthanasia and was incensed, as was his sister Sophie. The two obtained permission to reprint parts of the sermon, and the White Rose began. The group believed that if people were informed of the truth, they would do something to change the situation. Unfortunately, that was not always the case. The prominent group members were eventually caught and beheaded by the Nazi party. Hans’s last words were (translated) “Long live freedom!” The words of these passionate young people should challenge us today as our rights are being taken: “…why do you allow these men who are in power to rob you step by step, openly and in secret, of one domain of your rights after another, until one day nothing, nothing at all will be left but a mechanised state system presided over by criminals and drunks? Is your spirit already so crushed by abuse that you forget it is your right – or rather, your moral duty – to eliminate this system?” (From Leaflet 3)

Entrance to Hitler's Bunker

Entrance to Hitler’s Bunker

Finally, after the exhibits, we made our way into the bunker. It is indeed a creepy place, as one would expect from the location from which Hitler planned a lot of his strategies for world dominance. There is a small display of pictures in the beginning of the bunker which chronicle items found in the bunker when Allied troops arrived. Inside, you are able to see the different chambers where officials stayed, as well as the guard posts equipped with three machine gun holes to “dissuade” anyone who entered the bunker unwelcomed. It was an incredible experience, though thoroughly chilling.

The Eagle's Nest viewed from the Documentation Museum

The Eagle’s Nest viewed from the Documentation Museum

We had the choice (for an additional $21.50 Euros) of going up to the Eagle’s Nest. This house was a gift from the Nazi party (planned by SS leader and Hitler’s private secretary Martin Bormann) to celebrate Hitler’s 50th birthday. We opted not to take the trip, since the Eagle’s Nest was only visited by Hitler between 10 and 14 times, due to his fear of heights. His mistress Eva Braun loved to go there and sunbathe. Additionally, the Eagle’s Nest is now a restaurant, though parts of the lower levels can be seen on private tours. Mostly, the only thing remaining is a mantle given to Hitler by Mussolini, parts of which were chipped away as souvenirs by Allied troops. The house Hitler lived in which was near the bunker was destroyed by Allied forces, much to the joy of the townspeople.

From the Documentation Museum, we went to Konigssee, where incidentally Eva also liked to sunbathe–apparently, she did that a lot. It boasts a beautiful lake and a boat ride you can take (for $13 Euros) to see beautiful scenery and St. Bartholomä Cathedral. Unfortunately, since I spent too much time at Hitler’s bunker, we arrived just after the last boat had departed.

Front of the von Trapp family home used in the movie

Front of the von Trapp family home used in the movie

On the way home, we decided to drive through Salzburg and try to find the house used for the front of the von Trapp family home in The Sound of Music. This time we were successful! I had gotten the address off the internet, and, after driving down a pedestrian and bikes only lane, we parked on a street we COULD drive on and walked down. The house is The Mozarteum Music Academy, but the gates were open, so we decided to look around 🙂 Another beautiful day!

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